The Parish

Dodderhill Parish Council

The parish council usually meet at 7:30PM on the 1st Monday of every month at Wychbold Village Hall.  Everyone is welcome to attend and listen to the proceedings.  There is a public open session at each meeting to allow members of the public to question the council and this is followed by formal council business.

There are thirteen voluntary councillors and one professional Parish Clerk.  If a vacancy occurs on the council then it is normally advertised via the notice boards, website and magazine.  If you would like to join and help build our community please come along to a meeting or contact the Parish Clerk for further details.

What does Dodderhill Parish Council do?

Dodderhill Parish Council is a small local authority that represents the first level of local government.  As it is the authority closest to the people, parish councils are invariably the first place people will go with concerns or ideas and for this reason they are a vital part of any community.

Parish councils have a wide range of powers, duties and responsibilities which are essentially related to local matters.  Here are just some of Dodderhill Parish Council’s responsibilities:

  • Owns and maintains the playing fields and open space around Wychbold Village Hall, including the children’s play area.
  • Helps support Wychbold Village Hall Committee by funding some of the maintenance and repairs.
  • Provides and maintains the bus shelters and litter/dog waste bins.
  • Employs a Lengthsman, as part of the County Council Lengthsman Scheme, to carry out extra maintenance around the village.  This may include the cleaning of signs, clearing of drains and removal of vegetation from public areas and footpaths.
  • Comments on all planning applications in the parish.  Wychavon District Council then makes the final decision, taking into account our views along with the planning rules and regulations.

Where do Parish Councils get their Funding?

  1. Each year the council raises a ‘precept’ on council tax payers to cover the cost of running expenses.
  2. By applying for project-specific grants (for example Lottery funding, Lengthsman Scheme, Local Authority grants).
  3. Via the levy imposed on some types of building development (known as Section 106 funding).  This money can only be spent on specific projects as set out in each planning agreement.